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The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression
The Forgotten Man A New History of the Great Depression
Author: Amity Shlaes
It's difficult today to imagine how America survived the Great Depression. Only through the stories of the common people who struggled during that era can we really understand how the nation endured. These are the people at the heart of Amity Shlaes's insightful and inspiring history of one of the most crucial events of the twentieth century. ...  more »
ISBN-13: 9780066211701
ISBN-10: 0066211700
Publication Date: 6/1/2007
Pages: 480
Rating:
  • Currently 3.4/5 Stars.
 9

3.4 stars, based on 9 ratings
Publisher: HarperCollins
Book Type: Hardcover
Other Versions: Paperback, Audio CD
Members Wishing: 1
Reviews: Member | Amazon | Write a Review
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thedudeabides avatar reviewed The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression on + 28 more book reviews
The main question of the book, why did the Great Depression last so long, is simply not answered in this book. From that failed premise, things go downhill. Maybe the author THINKS she wrote a book about the common man's experiences during the depression, but I read a book that ceaselessly criticized New Deal attempts to stop starvation and economic disaster. If you really want to see the country go back to the gold standard (and base our entire economy on a single, naturally-occurring element that you have no control over where and when it is discovered in the natural world), this is the book for you.
hardtack avatar reviewed The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression on + 2554 more book reviews
While this book covers a period of American history I find fascinating, as I am a child of two people who lived though that era, the book wasn't. It just seemed to meander. The author is all over the place, even within paragraphs, jumping about making comments about various people. It got so I forgot who these people were or what importance they might have by the middle of the next paragraph. Perhaps it got better later on, but there are so many other books awaiting my time, I decided not to take the chance.

So, after about 70 some pages, I decided to stop reading. As the book is heavily underlined, it is on its way back to the thrift store.


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